Author: Vanessa Talbot

Vanessa Talbot

• Product Owner •

Vanessa Talbot joined 4D Program team in June, 2014. As a Product Owner, she is in charge of writing the user stories then translating it to functional specifications. Her role is also to make sure that the feature implementation delivered is meeting the customer need.

Since her arrival, she has worked to define key features in 4D. She has worked on most of preemptive multi-threading new features and also on a very complex subject: the new architecture for engined application. Vanessa has a degree from Telecom Saint-Etienne. She began her career at the Criminal Research Institute as a developer for the audiovisual department. She has also worked in media and medical fields as expert in technical support, production as well as documenting new features.
Tips

Binary database vs. Project database

Automatically translated from English

As you know, 4D now supports two ways to work with sources: binary and project databases. Binary databases are the 4D we all know and love, with source code in a binary file to allow team development with 4D Server, and all of the design elements (methods, forms, structure, etc.) gathered in a single, compact binary file, the “.4db” file. Project databases make it easier for distributed teams to work collaboratively by storing the source code in a source control system in separate, plain text files. Projects will not replace the 4DB, we have no plans to make the 4DB disappear. It’s about two different ways of working and developing. It’s up to you to choose what best suits your needs. Here’s a blog post to help you decide:

Product

SVG “non-scaling-stroke” attribute support

Automatically translated from English

Sometimes it’s preferable to have the lines of an object keep their original width, regardless of the applied transformation. For example, you draw a line on a map showing a user’s position and a destination. When the user zooms in on the map, you want to enlarge the map but have the line maintain its width.

Product

Code Editor: Say hello to Comment blocks

Automatically translated from English

Adding a block of comments at the beginning of a method is useful for adding a note about what a method does, as well as a list of input/output parameters. And having a few lines of human-readable text within a complicated section of code can be convenient to help you and others recall the purpose of this particular section of code. Beginning with 4D v18, your programming experience is enhanced with the addition of comment blocks!

Tips

Project database: Deploying your application

Automatically translated from English

So your application has been developed and you’re ready for the next step. 4D lets you:

  • generate a compiled database that no longer contains any interpreted code,
  • generate a standalone application that can be double-clicked, (i.e., merged with 4D Volume Desktop, 4D’s database engine),
  • generate client/server applications with automatic updates of client and server parts.

 

With a project database, you can also build your final applications for both platforms. A project database uses the same configuration file as a binary database.

Tips

Project Databases: Post conversion

Automatically translated from English

In this blog post, we showed you how to convert a binary database into a project database. Once everything is ready and the conversion has successfully completed, you can start working with your project database. However, some questions may arise: are all the files in the database useful? It’s obvious that the”.4DB” structure file is no longer needed. Can I delete other files?

Here’s everything you need to know after the conversion.